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Democracy has been taken for granted at a time when it is most endangered. Neo-Conservatives are organized to replace it with oligarchy, to replace consent for the rule of law with fascistic allegiance to the executive branch disguised as "patriotism." As a team made up of a political philosopher and a writer, we consider otherwise repressed information from a critical perspective in the hope of elevating the quality of our political dialogue so that it is worthy of a truly democratic society.

Monday, April 18, 2005

A Radical in the White House

An excellent essay from today's New York Times

By Bob Herbert

"Last week - April 12, to be exact - was the 60th anniversary of the death of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. 'I have a terrific headache,' he said, before collapsing at the Little White House in Warm Springs, Ga. He died of a massive cerebral hemorrhage on the 83rd day of his fourth term as president. His hold on the nation was such that most Americans, stunned by the announcement of his death that spring afternoon, reacted as though they had lost a close relative.

"That more wasn't made of this anniversary is not just a matter of time; it's a measure of the distance the U.S. has traveled from the egalitarian ideals championed by F.D.R. His goal was 'to make a country in which no one is left out.' That kind of thinking has long since been consigned to the political dumpster. We're now in the age of Bush, Cheney and DeLay, small men committed to the concentration of big bucks in the hands of the fortunate few.
To get a sense of just how radical Roosevelt was (compared with the politics of today), consider the State of the Union address he delivered from the White House on Jan. 11, 1944. He was already in declining health and, suffering from a cold, he gave the speech over the radio in the form of a fireside chat.

"After talking about the war, which was still being fought on two fronts, the president offered what should have been recognized immediately for what it was, nothing less than a blueprint for the future of the United States. It was the clearest statement I've ever seen of the kind of nation the U.S. could have become in the years between the end of World War II and now. Roosevelt referred to his proposals in that speech as 'a second Bill of Rights under which a new basis of security and prosperity can be established for all regardless of station, race or creed.'

"Among these rights, he said, are:

"'The right to a useful and remunerative job in the industries or shops or farms or mines of the nation.'

"'The right to earn enough to provide adequate food and clothing and recreation.'

"'The right of every farmer to raise and sell his products at a return which will give him and his family a decent living.'

"'The right of every businessman, large and small, to trade in an atmosphere of freedom from unfair competition and domination by monopolies at home or abroad.'

"'The right of every family to a decent home.'

"'The right to adequate medical care and the opportunity to achieve and enjoy good health.'

"'The right to adequate protection from the economic fears of old age, sickness, accident and unemployment.'

"'The right to a good education.'

"I mentioned this a few days ago to an acquaintance who is 30 years old. She said, 'Wow, I can't believe a president would say that.'" [...]

Read the entire essay here [require a free, one time registration].

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